Whittredge-Camp Meeting painting

HIST 3328

History of Religion in America

Fall 2020

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1:00 p.m.–1:50 p.m.

 

Dr. Mark Stoll

Office: HH 135

Office hours: Monday 2:00–3:00 p.m.; Friday, 9:30–10:30 a.m.; and by appointment

E-mail: Mark.Stoll@ttu.edu

Web: http://www.markstoll.net/

Tel.: (806) 834-6285

 

IMPORTANT COVID19 INFORMATION

History of Religion in America” examines the ways that Americans have expressed and acted on religious belief from before Columbus until the present. The course investigates how religion has influenced (and been influenced by) society, ideas, economics, politics, gender relations, and many other historical factors. Through lecture, readings, and discussion, students will explore the sometimes strange and fascinating world of religion in America.

 

REQUIRED BOOKS

Allan Greer, Mohawk Saint: Catherine Tekakwitha and the Jesuits

Jon Butler, Awash in a Sea of Faith: Christianizing the American People,  pp. 1-193 (on library reserve)

Ann Braude, Sisters and Saints: Women and American Religion

Heath W. Carter, Union Made: Working People and the Rise of Social Christianity in Chicago

Wallace D. Best, Passionately Human, No Less Divine: Religious Culture in the Black Churches of Chicago, 1915–1952

Randall J. Stephens, The Devil’s Music: How Christians Inspired, Condemned, and Embraced Rock 'n' Roll

 

 

ASSIGNMENTS

60% total: Three midterm examinations (13%) and a cumulative final examination (21%)
30% total: Six readings quizzes
10%: A 4–6 page analytical book review

 

Exams:

Exams will consist of short answers and an essay. Students will have an opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge of religious history as well as to engage issues raised in lectures and readings. Make-up exams will be given on the last Tuesday of classes only.

 

Quizzes:

Quizzes will test students’ comprehension and understanding of the readings. Make-up quizzes will be given on the last Tuesday of classes only.

 

Paper:

Students will write an analytical book review on a book of their choice, drawn from the professor’s bibliography (excluding edited collections of essays or books required for the course). Papers must be between four and six pages in length, double spaced, with one-inch margins all around, in 12-point Times New Roman, with a cover sheet, and stapled in the upper lefthand corner. Grammar and punctuation must be correct. For links to online writing advice, see http://uwc.ttu.edu/Resources/default.asp. Also the University Writing Center (paid for by your fees!) would be happy to help you polish your writing. They can help you in person or via the Internet, and can be reached through their Website: http://uwc.ttu.edu/. No footnotes or bibliography is needed. Cite sources for quotations by putting the page number(s) in parentheses after the quotation marks and before any punctuation, thusly: (p. 57).

Instructions for the analytical book review: For this review, students will select a book on religious history from the bibliography of American religious history on the professor’s Website. There is a full bibliography here http://www.markstoll.net/Bibliographies/US/Religious.htm and an abridged one here http://www.markstoll.net/HIST3328/2017/Short_bib.htm.Students may select a book not on the bibliography if the professor approves it. The book review will have three sections:

  • A short summary (not a table of contents or outline) of the book’s contents. This should not take more than a paragraph or two.
  • An explanation of the book’s thesis, with a discussion of how the author has supported the thesis. You can often find a statement of the book’s thesis in its preface, introduction, or conclusion. Reread these sections after you finish your book. (Ask the professor, if you have any doubts. Many students miss or confuse the thesis!)
  • Most important, an analysis of the book, including how successful it is (or is not!) in supporting its thesis, what the author’s bias (that is, its point of view) is, whether it agrees or disagrees with other class material, how it might be improved, how well it is written, and whether you agree with the book’s conclusions. Would you recommend it to others? Give examples to support each point of your analysis.

Late Papers: The professor accepts late papers, but deducts 5 points from the paper grade for each weekday they are late. Papers handed in after the beginning of class period on the day they are due are already late. No computer excuses accepted; give yourself extra time for last-minute disasters like printer problems, etc.

Plagiarism: Using text written by someone else (even in a close paraphrase) without clear and unambiguous acknowledgment is academic dishonesty and will result in an “F” for the course.

 

ATTENDANCE

The professor will take roll at the beginning of each class. Students with a perfect attendance record will receive three bonus points on their final grades. Students with more than two absences will receive one point off their final grades for each absence over two. The instructor will accept excuses in cases of true need as documented appropriately.

 


HIST 3328 Course Schedule
Fall 2020

 

August

 

Sun

 

Mon

 

Tue

 

Wed

 

Thu

 

Fri

 

Sat

23

 

24 Introduction: What is religion?

 

25

 

26 Religions of Native America

 

27

 

28

The Evolution of European Religion

 

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30

 

31

The Evolution of European Religion, cont.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September

 

Sun

 

Mon

 

Tue

 

Wed

 

Thu

 

Fri

 

Sat

 

 

 

 

1

 

2

The Reformation

 

3

 

 

4

Rise of English Puritanism

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

7

Labor Day
No class

 

8

 

9

Quiz: Greer, Mohawk Saint

 

10

 

11

Puritan New England

 

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 

14

Puritan New England, cont.

 

15

 

16

Troubles in New England

 

17

 

18

The Great Awakening

 

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

 

21

Quiz: Butler, Awash in a Sea of Faith

 

22

 

23

EXAMINATION #1

 

24

 

25 Establishment and Diversity

 

26

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

 

28 Enlightenment and Religion

 

29

 

30

Religion and Revolution

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October

 

Sun

 

Mon

 

Tue

 

Wed

 

Thu

 

Fri

 

Sat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

2

Religion in the New Nation

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

5

Quiz: Braude, Sisters and Saints

 

6

 

7

The Second Great Awakening

 

8

 

9

The Second Great Awakening in the North

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

 

12

The Second Great Awakening in the North, cont.

 

13

 

14

EXAMINATION #2

 

15

 

16 Mormonism

 

17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

 

19

Quiz: Carter, Union Made

 

20

 

21

Unitarianism and Transcen­dentalism

 

22

 

23

Religion and the Civil War

 

24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

 

26

Religion and the Civil War, cont.

 

27

 

28

Science and Protestantism

 

29

 

30 Catholicism in the nineteenth century

 

31

 

November

 

Sun

 

Mon

 

Tue

 

Wed

 

Thu

 

Fri

 

Sat

1

 

2

Quiz: Best, Passionately Human, No Less Divine

 

3

 

4

Catholicism in the nineteenth century, cont.

 

5

 

6

EXAMINATION #3

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

9

Catholicism in the nineteenth century, cont.

 

10

 

11

Liberal Protestantism

 

12

 

13

The Social Gospel

 

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

16

Quiz: Stephens, The Devil’s Music

 

17

 

18

Fundamentalism

 

19

 

20

Religion between the World Wars

 

21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

 

23

Jews in America

 

24

 

25

Thanksgiving Break--No class

 

26

 

27

Thanksgiving Break--No class

 

28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29

 

30

Churches in the Fifties and Sixties

Book review due

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

December

 

Sun

 

Mon

 

Tue

 

Wed

 

Thu

 

Fri

 

Sat

 

 

 

 

1

All Make‑Up Exams and Quizzes, All Day

 

2

Sixties and Seventies: Transformation of Popular Religion

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

7

 

8

FINAL

1:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: "Religious holy day" means a holy day observed by a religion whose places of worship are exempt from property taxation under Texas Tax Code §11.20. A student who intends to observe a religious holy day should make that intention known in writing to the instructor prior to the absence. A student who is absent from classes for the observance of a religious holy day shall be allowed to take an examination or complete an assignment scheduled for that day within a reasonable time after the absence. A student who is excused under this provision may not be penalized for the absence; however, the instructor may respond appropriately if the student fails to complete the assignment satisfactorily. See University Standard Operating Procedure 34.19.

Note: Any student who, because of a disability, may require special arrangements in order to meet the course requirements should contact the instructor as soon as possible to make any necessary arrangements. Students should present appropriate verification from Student Disability Services during the instructor’s office hours. Please note: instructors are not allowed to provide classroom accommodations to a student until appropriate verification from Student Disability Services has been provided. For additional information, please contact Student Disability Services in West Hall or call 806-742-2405.

TTU Statement of Academic Integrity (OP 34.12):

    The professor reserves the right to change this syllabus at his discretion. Changes will be announced in class and posted on the class Webpages. © 2020 Mark R. Stoll. All rights reserved.